For Your Business/Freelance Biz

  • Accessorize Your Website Like a Super Model!

    This is part of a series called How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website. You can get all the blog posts in this series in your free How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website Planner here.

    Accessorize Your Website Like a Supermodel!

    Unless your business is local and does not rely on the Internet for bringing in clients, then you very likely need more (much more) than a page or two to attract the best clients. Just as you never see a supermodel wearing a sleek black dress without shoes or earrings or a fashionable clutch, you’ll never find a well-planned website that isn’t sporting at least a few matching accessories.

    For a solopreneur, speaker/author, or coach’s website, those accessories might include:

    • A YouTube channel
    • A podcast
    • A blog
    • Free webinars

    Of course, you don’t have to include them all. Which ones you choose will depend on your preferences, your goals, and (most importantly) the needs of your audience.

    If you love to write and your market enjoys keeping up with blogs, then a blog is an important accessory for your website. If you hate to write and know you won’t be consistent with your blogging, then a YouTube channel or a podcast is probably a better choice for you.

    Another thing to keep in mind is the format of your products and programs. If they are video-based, then using video to accessorize your site is a natural fit. After all, if your clients prefer to learn via video—which they do if they’re buying your video-based programs—then they’ll obviously like to see other video content as well.

    TAKE ACTION

    What accessories would you like to incorporate on your website? Make a list of what you’d like to add and set yourself a deadline to get the work done. And if you need any help with your website I can help. I have website packages here and other business services here.

    This is part of a series called How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website. You can get all the blog posts in this series in your free How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website Planner here.

    CONTINUE READING

  • Eliminate the Leaks On Your Website

    This is part of a series called How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website. You can get all the blog posts in this series in your free How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website Planner here.

    Eliminate the Leaks On Your Website

    One big issue many websites have is leaks. These are the places where your potential clients leave your site, never to return. Maybe it’s the links to your social accounts, videos that recommend content other than yours, or even product recommendations you’re making in your blog.

    While many of these things are necessary for business growth and better SEO, there are ways you can help ensure that offering your readers content outside your domain doesn’t lead them down a path they won’t return from.

    Social Links

    Let’s start with social. You probably have a nifty little row of social media icons somewhere near the top of your website. Most sites have these, with the reasoning being that you want readers to know where you hang out, so they can join you. The problem is, this is a huge traffic leak! One “in the know” website recently termed these icons “candy-colored exit signs.” And that’s exactly what they are—an invitation to leave your site.

    Here’s a better option: put your social media links in your footer. Readers will still find them, but they won’t be quite the compelling invitation they are when placed so prominently near the top of your site. Save that prime real estate for calls to action that benefit you, not Facebook.

    YouTube Videos

    Another very common link is YouTube videos. While embedding them on your site and in your blog posts is great for reader interaction (nearly everyone loves video) and to increase time on your site, they’re also leading readers away by promoting “related videos.”

    You can easily turn this option off when you grab the embed code from YouTube, just by unchecking the box that says “Show suggested videos when the video finishes.” Make it a habit to do that whenever you showcase a YouTube video, and you’ll plug a very large leak that takes readers away from your site.

    Links to Other Websites

    Finally, what about links to other websites? These are important for SEO, because Google and other search engines prefer to recommend sites that feature outbound links. It shows you are offering your readers the best information available, even if it’s not on your site.

    The trouble is, clicking those links will take your reader off your page. The best way to fix this leak is to simply make all off-site links open in a new tab. That way your reader won’t lose her place on your site even if she does decide to check out that other resource you mentioned.

    TAKE ACTION

    Review your entire website and see where you may have “leaks” and fix them as outlined above.

    This is part of a series called How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website. You can get all the blog posts in this series in your free How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website Planner here.

    CONTINUE READING

  • How to Fill in the Gaps on Your Website

    This is part of a series called How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website. You can get all the blog posts in this series in your free How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website Planner here.

    Fill In the Gaps

    In Part 2 we talked about mapping the flow of your website to lead readers from one step to another. Now it’s time to fill in those few missing pieces that tie the whole thing together, including:

    • List-building opportunities
    • Buy buttons
    • Sales pages
    • Contact forms

    Some of these may seem obvious, but you’d be shocked to know just how often these important pieces are ignored on otherwise well-planned sites.

    For example, if list-building is your site’s primary goal (defined in Part 1) you should have an opt-in form:

    • In your site header
    • In your sidebar
    • In your footer
    • At the end of each blog post

    You should also have a dedicated opt-in page (or two, or more) that you link to from the pages and posts on your site, as well as from social media.

    If your site’s main goal is sales, then it’s critical that you make it obvious you have something to buy. Create a “products” page and include it in your primary navigation. Link to relevant products from your blog posts. Include your products as upsells on the thank you pages your subscribers see. Remember, visitors can’t buy if they don’t know you’re selling. Make sure they know.

    And what if your potential clients have questions? How can they reach you? Do you have a clear contact page that’s easy to find and use? It’s a simple task to create a form that allows your readers to email you directly from your site. You can also include:

    • Social media links
    • Your phone number
    • Your chatbot link

    Giving your clients a variety of ways to reach you will help establish your credibility and that all-important “know, like and trust” factor.

    TAKE ACTION

    Review your website’s existing pages to see any gaps. Create new pages as needed and modify the remaining to make sure you’re properly displaying your services and products to maximize your sales.

    This is part of a series called How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website. You can get all the blog posts in this series in your free How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website Planner here.

    CONTINUE READING

  • Attracting the Right Traffic to Your Website

    This is part of a series called How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website. You can get all the blog posts in this series in your free How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website Planner here.

    Attracting the Right Traffic to Your Website

    Building a website is only the beginning. Attracting the right traffic to your newly built site is the key to growing your list and making sales. After all, you might have thousands of visitors each month, but if your ideal client is a single woman in her 50s and all your traffic is men in their 20s, you’re not going to sell anything.

    Bringing the right traffic in depends on many things:

    • Using the correct language (do you sound like a friend and confidant or more like an out-of-touch college professor?)
    • Getting found in the search results (are you targeting the keywords your audience uses?)
    • Creating the content your audience wants and needs (are you offering only blog posts while your audience is listening to podcasts?)

    Get the right balance of these elements, and you’ll find that your website traffic is ideally suited for your products and programs, that they happily take advantage of your offers, and that your business grows naturally along a path you love.

    How can you know you’re using the right language and creating products that will resonate with your market? You ask them.

    The number one easiest way to find out is to create a customer survey. You can set up a simple survey using Google Forms or SurveyMonkey, and then share the link via your email list (add it to your autoresponder to keep the flow of information going) and social media.

    Be sure to ask a variety of open-ended and multiple choice questions, but keep the survey short as well. You can’t expect anyone to spend more than a few minutes answering questions.

    Some questions you might want to consider include:

    • Demographic questions such as age, income level, education level
    • “Biggest issue” questions (this will tell you exactly what programs you need to create)
    • Business or life level questions—where are they in their journey?
    • Cost questions—how much are they willing/able to pay for a solution

    Another option is to do phone or Zoom interviews with some of your clients or potential clients and ask them questions to determine words to use on your website.

    As you browse the answers, pay close attention to the words and phrases your audience uses (these will give you insight into search terms to target), the problems they face (so you can create products to solve them), and the level they are at in business. This is your market, and if your website clearly speaks their language and solves their problems, you’ll never again have to worry about attracting the right traffic—it will happen quite naturally all on its own.

    Does your website need a reboot and SEO boost? Learn more here.

    TAKE ACTION

    • Set up a survey and/or interviews
    • Review all answers and determine what words, images, etc. would be the best fit for your website
    • Implement the new ideas on your website.
    • If you need a new website or a website refresh, let’s chat. Learn more here.

    This is part of a series called How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website. You can get all the blog posts in this series in your free How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website Planner here.

    CONTINUE READING

  • It’s All About You! aka Your Brand is YOU!)

    This is part of a series called How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website. You can get all the blog posts in this series in your free How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website Planner here.

    Beautiful Branding

    When you think of branding, what comes to mind?

    Logos? Colors? Clever mascots?

    That’s what most people think of, so you’re not alone, but there is so much more to branding than the colors on your site and your logo—although both of those things are important, of course.

    Here’s how Entrepreneur Magazine defines it:

    Branding is a marketing strategy that involves creating a differentiated name and image — often using a logo and/or tag line — in order to establish a presence in the consumer’s mind and attract and keep customers. 

    And here’s what BusinessDictionary.com has to say:

    Branding aims to establish a significant and differentiated presence in the market that attracts and retains loyal customers.

    It’s clear that while your logo and colors are important, there are other factors to consider as well, the most important of which is your unique selling proposition.

    The key is to merge all the elements of your brand into one stunning, unforgettable website:

    • Logo and colors
    • Fonts
    • Your Unique Selling Proposition (part 4 will help with that)
    • Your tagline or “wow” statement

    You can choose to work with a branding expert who will guide you through the process, or you can choose the DIY approach. No matter which method you choose, though, it pays to put in some work first, so you can have a better idea of what you’re trying to accomplish.

    If you’re looking for a branding expert I’ve teamed up with Mel DePaoli, owner of Omicle and together we can help you get some brilliant branding for your website that really communicates your message. Learn more here.

    TAKE ACTION

    Get brainstorming your branding. A great way to do this is with Pinterest Boards. You can create Boards and make them private and then share with others to view and give feedback on.

    A few of the items to include in your branding brainstorming:

    • Colors you love
    • Logo ideas
    • Fonts that appeal to you
    • Headshots and other images you like (both yours and those of other people)
    • Your tagline or “wow” statement

    Do you use Canva? If so, once you’ve finalized your branding you can add your branding elements to Canva for easy access every time you do a project. Learn more here.

    And if you’re looking for a complete DIY option to create your branding kit check out http://www.CreativeMarketing.com or Envato Elements.

    This is part of a series called How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website. You can get all the blog posts in this series in your free How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website Planner here.

    CONTINUE READING