Month: June 2019

  • It’s All About You! aka Your Brand is YOU!)

    This is part of a series called How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website. You can get all the blog posts in this series in your free How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website Planner here.

    Beautiful Branding

    When you think of branding, what comes to mind?

    Logos? Colors? Clever mascots?

    That’s what most people think of, so you’re not alone, but there is so much more to branding than the colors on your site and your logo—although both of those things are important, of course.

    Here’s how Entrepreneur Magazine defines it:

    Branding is a marketing strategy that involves creating a differentiated name and image — often using a logo and/or tag line — in order to establish a presence in the consumer’s mind and attract and keep customers. 

    And here’s what BusinessDictionary.com has to say:

    Branding aims to establish a significant and differentiated presence in the market that attracts and retains loyal customers.

    It’s clear that while your logo and colors are important, there are other factors to consider as well, the most important of which is your unique selling proposition.

    The key is to merge all the elements of your brand into one stunning, unforgettable website:

    • Logo and colors
    • Fonts
    • Your Unique Selling Proposition (part 4 will help with that)
    • Your tagline or “wow” statement

    You can choose to work with a branding expert who will guide you through the process, or you can choose the DIY approach. No matter which method you choose, though, it pays to put in some work first, so you can have a better idea of what you’re trying to accomplish.

    If you’re looking for a branding expert I’ve teamed up with Mel DePaoli, owner of Omicle and together we can help you get some brilliant branding for your website that really communicates your message. Learn more here.

    TAKE ACTION

    Get brainstorming your branding. A great way to do this is with Pinterest Boards. You can create Boards and make them private and then share with others to view and give feedback on.

    A few of the items to include in your branding brainstorming:

    • Colors you love
    • Logo ideas
    • Fonts that appeal to you
    • Headshots and other images you like (both yours and those of other people)
    • Your tagline or “wow” statement

    Do you use Canva? If so, once you’ve finalized your branding you can add your branding elements to Canva for easy access every time you do a project. Learn more here.

    And if you’re looking for a complete DIY option to create your branding kit check out http://www.CreativeMarketing.com or Envato Elements.

    This is part of a series called How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website. You can get all the blog posts in this series in your free How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website Planner here.

    CONTINUE READING

  • How to Map Out Your Website to Attract More Clients

    This is part of a series called How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website. You can get all the blog posts in this series in your free How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website Planner here.

    Beautiful Branding

    When you think of branding, what comes to mind?

    Logos? Colors? Clever mascots?

    That’s what most people think of, so you’re not alone, but there is so much more to branding than the colors on your site and your logo—although both of those things are important, of course.

    Here’s how Entrepreneur Magazine defines it:

    Branding is a marketing strategy that involves creating a differentiated name and image — often using a logo and/or tag line — in order to establish a presence in the consumer’s mind and attract and keep customers. 

    And here’s what BusinessDictionary.com has to say:

    Branding aims to establish a significant and differentiated presence in the market that attracts and retains loyal customers.

    It’s clear that while your logo and colors are important, there are other factors to consider as well, the most important of which is your unique selling proposition.

    The key is to merge all the elements of your brand into one stunning, unforgettable website:

    • Logo and colors
    • Fonts
    • Your Unique Selling Proposition (part 4 will help with that)
    • Your tagline or “wow” statement

    You can choose to work with a branding expert who will guide you through the process, or you can choose the DIY approach. No matter which method you choose, though, it pays to put in some work first, so you can have a better idea of what you’re trying to accomplish.

    If you’re looking for a branding expert I’ve teamed up with Mel DePaoli, owner of Omicle and together we can help you get some brilliant branding for your website that really communicates your message. Learn more here.

    TAKE ACTION

    Get brainstorming your branding. A great way to do this is with Pinterest Boards. You can create Boards and make them private and then share with others to view and give feedback on.

    A few of the items to include in your branding brainstorming:

    • Colors you love
    • Logo ideas
    • Fonts that appeal to you
    • Headshots and other images you like (both yours and those of other people)
    • Your tagline or “wow” statement

    Do you use Canva? If so, once you’ve finalized your branding you can add your branding elements to Canva for easy access every time you do a project. Learn more here.

    And if you’re looking for a complete DIY option to create your branding kit check out http://www.CreativeMarketing.com or Envato Elements.

    This is part of a series called How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website. You can get all the blog posts in this series in your free How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website Planner here.

    CONTINUE READING

  • How to Map Out Your Website to Attract More Clients

    This is part of a series called How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website. You can get all the blog posts in this series in your free How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website Planner here.

    In part 1 you defined your primary and secondary goals for your website. Now that you know what you want visitors to your site to do, it’s time to make it easy for them to do it. As you saw in part one, the top section of every page on your site is the perfect place to showcase your primary goal, whether that’s an opt-in form, a buy button, or an invitation to schedule an appointment.

    But what about the other sections of your site? How do you envision blog readers will find your products? How will potential clients discover your areas of expertise?

    Sketching out a website “map” will help you visualize the flow of traffic from one page to the next. Your primary navigation menu will follow this map, so if it helps, think of the pages you will want to include there, and how they might link to one another, like this:

    • Home: Links to your opt-in offer, your discovery session schedule, and your products page.
    • Blog: Individual posts all link to your opt-in offer plus the appropriate sales page as well as additional blog posts and other information which is useful to your ideal reader.
    • Work With Me: Your primary service offering, links to your discovery session booking and products pages.
    • Products: Links to related product pages.
    • About Me: Links to “Work With Me”
    • Contact: Links to product pages.

    Your website may have more (or fewer) top-level pages in your map, depending on the number of products you offer, whether or not you have a podcast or YouTube channel if you have a press or speaker package, or other business divisions.

    No matter the number of pages on your site, though, you should be sure that each one leads naturally to the next. Remember, your potential clients won’t always know what the next step is, so it’s your website’s job to show them the way.

    TAKE ACTION

    1. List all the different pages you think you’ll need on your website. Check out colleagues or competitors to see what pages they have on their site. If it’s easy to find things on their website you can do something similar.
    2. Map out your website with top-level pages and subpages. This can be as simple as a drawing on paper or what I suggest is using Canva to create your sitemap. If you’re not familiar with Canva, it’s an online graphic tool that has tons of templates you can use for graphic projects. They even have a few website sitemap templates to get you started! Go here to see the templates and sign up for your free Canva account. Here’s a sample of a template in Canva. I haven’t altered this in any way. I simply chose this template and downloaded it.
    3. Once you’ve got your sitemap draft ask someone to review it and see if it makes sense to them. And if you need help creating or redesigning your website let’s chat. You can learn more here.

    This is part of a series called How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website. You can get all the blog posts in this series in your free How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website Planner here.

    CONTINUE READING

  • Is Your Website Presenting the Best “First Impression”​ of You and Your Brand?

    website

    This is part of a series called How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website. You can get all the blog posts in this series in your free How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website Planner here.

    Is your website presenting the best “first impression” of you and your brand?

    Does it confidently proclaim your expertise?

    Do visitors instantly know what you do and who you work with?

    If you can’t answer those questions with a resounding “Yes!” then your website could use some help.

    Here’s what you might not realize about websites and how readers see them. If you don’t capture your visitor’s attention within a few seconds, she’s very likely to click off the page—never to return.

    Even worse, if she lands on your site and isn’t immediately aware of what you do—if she’s confused at all—you’ll have to work harder to earn her trust.

    Your website has a big job to do, and it has to do it quickly. Some say in three seconds or less.

    Three seconds. 

    We all know the power of first impressions and how long-lasting they can be, so you simply cannot afford to waste those precious few seconds with a new visitor.

    With a well-planned, beautifully executed website, you’ll enjoy:

    • Better name recognition
    • More partnership opportunities
    • Increased sales (and profits)
    • Higher fees
    • More speaking engagements

    And best of all, your website will present the professional, polished image you want the world to see.

    Join me for my series on creating your client-attracting website starting with Step 1 below. And if you’d like to discuss your website project, let’s chat.

    STEP 1: DEFINE YOUR PRIMARY WEBSITE GOAL

    Your website has a lot of jobs to do. You want it to:

    • Attract new traffic
    • Grow your mailing list
    • Educate and inform your market
    • Sell your products and programs
    • Show off your expertise
    • Provide personal information for potential partners and the press

    But there can be only one main goal. This is the primary task you want your website to perform, and it will determine the traffic flow to and from every page on your site.

    For most solopreneurs, speakers or coaches, the primary goal is to get clients. That might mean you want people to sign up for your mailing list (if you have a rock-solid funnel that’s performing well), book a discovery session (if you are a proven “closer”), or purchase a product (if your sales pages rock and you have a good selection of programs to choose from).

    Your primary website goal will be the first thing you want people to see and do on your site. For example, if your goal is to build your list, an eye-catching opt-in form with a killer offer should be at the top of every page.

    Want to make sales? Be sure your site visitors know immediately that you have something to sell (you’d be shocked how many people miss this simple piece of the puzzle) with both attention-grabbing graphics and clear calls to action.

    And if booking discovery calls is your goal, then clearly you want that option to be front and center on your website—or at least super easy to find.

    TAKE ACTION NOW

    Grab your computer or some paper and pen and generate some ideas while answering these questions:

    1. What is your MAIN website goal?
    2. What is your SECONDARY website goal?
    3. Start thinking about your website map, or pages you want to have and write them down.

    This is part of a series called How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website. You can get all the blog posts in this series in your free How to Map Out Your Client Getting Website Planner here.

    CONTINUE READING